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Chef David Burke’s Simple Salad Ideas

Chef David Burke’s Simple Salad Ideas


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Usually when people have to make a salad, they panic over what to include. There’s the base of the salad, but then there are the salad accents, like tomatoes, cucumbers, and sliced red onion. And what about avocado? Don’t some people put avocado in their salads? Or endive? Radicchio?

What to put in your salad can get confusing, which can lead to something that doesn’t taste good, or even a bad complex about making them. Oh, and then there’s the bottle of salad dressing you’re about to dress it with. That doesn’t help, either.

I like to keep my salads simple, and by simple I mean with very few ingredients and a really strong vinaigrette. I find that the more direct and straightforward that salads are, the more often they’ll shine. Just one or two staple ingredients and a creative vinaigrette, and you’ve got a star salad. Here are my favorite ideas.

Asparagus & Mushrooms Salad

Yes, these popular vegetables often seen as side dishes can be whipped into a salad creation. Roast mushroom caps and steam the asparagus. Make a vinaigrette by mincing the stems of the mushrooms and whisking them with fine herbs, a little bit of mustard, olive oil, and poppy seeds.

Peaches & Almonds Salad

This is one of my favorite sweet and salty combinations. I’ll make a vinaigrette of fresh herbs like basil, tarragon, and peach and lemon juice, and toss it all together for a fresh and fruity salad.

Tomato & Mozzarella Salad

A classic caprese can be given a huge update when you pay some attention to the vinaigrette. I like to use the seeds of the tomatoes and red pepper flakes to whisk into my balsamic and olive oil dressing.

Fava Beans and Peppadews Salad

Peppadews are South African piquanté peppers that have a tart, sweet flavor. You can often find them in jars in your grocery store. I’ll toss them with fava beans and a vinaigrette of mustard oil, red-wine vinegar, and oregano for a beautiful and flavorful salad.

Boston Lettuce and Parmesan Salad

This salad shines because of the buttery Boston lettuce and the salty cheese. To cut the richness of the cheese, I’ll serve it with a citrus-based vinaigrette made with orange juice and zest, and a few dabs of ranch dressing.

Grapes and Cornflakes Salad

Hear me out — this does not taste as weird as it sounds. The juicy grapes and the crunchy cornflakes create a wonderful combination of flavors and textures. I make a dressing of soy milk (for the cereal, of course) and lemon juice to cut the sweetness.

Bacon and Potatoes

We see these ingredients together often, and this salad recipe is one of my versions of potato salad. I toss potatoes and flecks of bacon with a dressing made of olive oil, Sriracha, and chives for a light and spicy potato salad.


How the Chefs at Great Restaurants Get Salads to Taste So Delicious

When you eat a salad at a nice restaurant, it tastes amazing. But when you make one for yourself for lunch on a random Saturday, it can be kind of sad. That's why we tapped Adin Langille, executive chef of the recently opened New York City restaurant David Burke Fabrick&mdashwhich has the type of salads you dream about at night for weeks afterward&mdashto share some of his secrets. Learn from them to take your own salads up a notch, and if you're feeling extra-ambitious, use the recipes he's shared to recreate some of his best veggie-based dishes at home.

Infuse Your Own Oil
The burrata salad at Fabrick is kind of like the Inception equivalent of salad: It's a recipe within a recipe within a recipe. Don't let that scare you off, though. Making your own infused oil&mdashand then using that to make a flavorful quinoa salad&mdashisn't hard. It does require a little prep work&mdashbut once you taste the difference, you'll never go back to boring old salads again.

Burrata Salad
1/2 small watermelon, cut into rectangular pieces
5 baby beets, roasted and peeled
1 bunch asparagus, blanched
1 tomato, sliced
6 thin slices of prosciutto
1 cup basil quinoa salad (recipe below)
3 balls of burrata cheese, cut in half
1/2 tsp espelette pepper or ground chili powder
2 Tbsp basil oil (recipe below)

Arrange all ingredients playfully, and garnish with basil oil and shaved* raw beets.

Basil-Quinoa Salad
2 cups water
1 Tbsp kosher salt
1 cup white quinoa
2 Tbsp basil oil (recipe below)
Salt and pepper

1. Heat water and salt in a small pot until it boils. Add quinoa slowly, and stir until water starts to simmer. Reduce heat to low, and cover.
2. Cook for 10-12 minutes, or until quinoa pops and becomes tender. Cool, and fluff with a fork.
3. Toss with basil oil, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Basil Oil
3 bunches basil, picked and cleaned
2 cups olive oil

Place basil and oil in a blender, and puree on high until mixture begins to steam and separate. Strain through a cheesecloth (it's available in many grocery stores or at cooking supply stores).

*You can use a vegetable peeler or a mandolin to shave veggies, which just means making thin slices of them.

Mix Multiple Lettuces
At home, you probably stick with romaine or kale and use that as your lettuce base. But switching up your leafy greens makes for a better salad right from the start. This one from chef Langille combines kale and escarole, then tops them with carrots, fennel, beets, and dressing.

Kale and Escarole Salad
1 bunch kale, washed, dried, and cut into 1" pieces
2 heads escarole, washed, dried, and cut into 1" pieces
1 cup baby heirloom carrots*, shaved**
1 cup baby fennel, shaved**
1 cup baby beets, shaved**
1/2 cup white balsamic vinaigrette (recipe below)
Salt and pepper

Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl, and dress until all leaves are coated but not dripping. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve.

White Balsamic Vinaigrette
1/2 cup white balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp honey
1 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper

Combine all ingredients except the oil in a mixing bowl, and whisk together. Slowly drizzle the oil into the mixture to form an emulsion. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

*You can use regular baby carrots if you can't find heirloom.
**You can use a vegetable peeler or a mandolin to shave veggies, which just means making thin slices of them.

Be Picky with Your Ingredients
Rather than making his market salad with just any type of goat cheese, chef Langille uses triple crème goat cheese because of its luscious texture. Similarly, he uses heirloom cherry tomatoes instead of the regular kind you find in the supermarket. Of course, you can substitute in any type of goat cheese or tomatoes in a pinch&mdashbut to really take the flavor up a notch, it helps to use premium and sometimes a little out-of-the-ordinary ingredients.

Market Salad
1 bunch romaine, washed, dried, and cut into 1" pieces
1 bunch Italian flat-leaf parsley, picked, washed, and dried
1 small bag baby spinach, de-stemmed, washed, and dried
1 cup white balsamic vinaigrette (see recipe on previous page)
Salt and pepper
Cooking spray
2 cups potato, diced
2 cups bacon, cut into small chunks
2 pieces triple crème goat cheese (soft creamy cheese with bloomy rind)
2 cups heirloom cherry tomatoes*, halved
1 cup white button mushroom, washed, dried, and shaved**

1. Toss all greens in a mixing bowl with vinaigrette, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
2. Spray a pan with cooking spray, then pan-fry diced potatoes over medium heat until tender throughout, about 8 minutes. Throw in bacon, and cook until heated through.
3. Cut goat cheese into bite-sized pieces. Place greens on a plate, then top with goat cheese and tomato. Finish with bacon and potato mixture, and add shaved fresh mushrooms on top.

*You can use regular cherry tomatoes if you can't find heirloom.
**You can use a vegetable peeler or a mandolin to shave veggies, which just means making thin slices of them.

All recipes adapted from Adin Langille, executive chef of New York City's David Burke Fabrick.


Michelin-Starred Salad Advice + 60 Tasty Salad Recipes

Nothing worse than a soggy, unseasoned and badly thought out salad, however, it seems to be one of those dishes that is too often left for the side of the table, and, unfortunately, one that doesn’t seem to require much love.

That’s why we’ve decided to bring you three salad recipes from Michelin-starred chefs that show you just how good salad can be. Hopefully providing you with some useful tips and tricks to employ the next time you're making salad at home.

There’s a fresh crab salad recipe from Richard Davies, a quail salad from Marcus Eaves and a salad of smoked pigeon and skate by Simon Hulstone.

For those who appreciate a more in depth understanding we have this scientific guide to salads. And for even more inspiration, here's a collection of 60 tasty salad recipes.


Top Chef recap: Interpret This!

Uh oh, you guys. Andy Cohen and Tom Colicchio are chatting with Amy Sedaris in the Bravo Clubhouse right now in a 𠇌raft-tacular Stoners’ Paradise” on Watch What Happens. A pot-smoke graphic is billowing over other memorable Top Chef dishes! They’re talking about �ndle salad”! I honestly have NO idea how I will manage to focus on this recap in the warming glow of the gayest, highest thing that ever aired. What? You think I should turn off the TV? That’s preposterous.

This week, we said goodbye to Happy/Blond/Gay Dale and Sommelier Stephen, who might not be able to find a power outlet let alone remember how to use a kitchen appliance … but he could certainly tell you about fashion! Except he’s not even that stylish. He just wears suits. Stephen could tell you all about his suits, and wine, and his spacious downtown Manhattan loft, and how “it was wonderful to put a chef coat back on.” That’s pretty much it.

David Chang (�sically the man,” according to Marcel) lorded over this week’s Quickfire challenge, which involved a mise-en-place relay race and 15 minutes (or less) to cook one dish. The cheftestants had split into four teams, named Green, Blue, White, and Red. Boring! This is Top Chef All-Stars — can we please step it up with some food-based colors? I’m much more likely to remember who made the weaker version of Lamb Carpaccio if something like “TEAM BABY EGGPLANT” is emblazoned over the dish.

Stephen, Tre, Richard, and Spike’s crispy lamb chop with artichoke three ways won the Quickfire without much fanfare. “I did take the lead it feels really good,” said Richard in a confessional. I bet 5,000 bonus dollars felt even better!

Elimination challenge: Create a dish for one of New York’s finest restaurants: Má Pຬhe (owned by David Chang), wd

50 (Wylie Dufresne), Marea (Michael White), or Townhouse (David Burke). Casey proved she would make a horrible psychic with her prediction that “In our group, [Happy] Dale has the best chance to win because his style is American just like David Burke’s.” How could she have known that Happy Dale would attempt a baseball game breakfast topped with Random Veal?

NEXT: Sommelier Stephen, children’s book author?!

The groups feasted at their host restaurants to research for the challenge and generally hate on each other. At Má Pຬhe, Tiffany found Angelo annoying because he “talks too much.” As of yet, she seems to have no problem with his tight pants (like Fabio). Over at Marea, which specializes in coastal Italian cuisine, Tre took offense to Stephen, who bragged that he �ts at Marea quite often.” “I’m not gonna be educated by Stephen,” claimed Tre with tremendous disdain. “I have my own palate.”

Stephen was so weird here, and in general. I can’t even deal with the following pungent gulps of Stephen’s word soup: “Marea is fine dining, suit and tie, something that I’m all about. Fashion has become like a major obsession of mine. Could be worse — could be cocaine, or heroin, so…”

I mean, I can forgive his attempt at humor with the awkward drug references, because we’ve all been there. But seriously, with those first two sentences? It’s like he has zero concept of the purpose of restaurants! If Stephen wrote a series of children’s books about restaurants, there probably wouldn’t even be food involved. It would just be a wide-eyed kid describing everyone’s outfits and criticizing how his mother’s gold jewelry clashed with the silverware. And instead of placing orders or eating, the characters would just daydream about which ties they could wear with which jackets the next time they went out to the large room with all the laminated word lists and tables. Actually I think this might be a horror series. Too bad Kitchen Nightmares is already taken.

Anthony Bourdain (yes!) and Kate Krader from Food & Wine magazine were the week’s guest judges, and the restaurant-hopping adventure offered us glimpses of New York City travel that were at times hilarious (Bourdain looking like a really uncomfortable giant in the backseat) and awe-inspiring (Padma in her wispy dress hailing a taxi like a f—ing goddess). At Marea, Michael White and the judges liked Tre’s swordfish, Spike’s seared branzino, and Richard’s crudo, but found Stephen’s salmon with black mission figs, broccoli rapini, and fennel pollen too aggressive. Specifically, “It tastes like a head shop,” said Bourdain. He would know!

Fabio had trouble accepting the idea that he should even have attempted to embrace the French-Vietnamese menu at Má Pຬhe. “It’s like, to us, an Asian grandma trying to make Osso Buco and please me.” I love how in Fabio’s mind there was suddenly an old Asian woman shooing him out of his own rustic Italian kitchen and, effectively, the icky French-Vietnamese one as well. All he had to do was try! But his unsolvable jigsaw puzzle of a dish just had too many components. Okay, who wants to feel queasy? Imagine eating a bite of all these flavors in succession: roasted lamb, hoisin plum barbeque sauce, corn tomato salad, lemongrass chevre ricotta. Now imagine them in the SAME bite. Agghhh! I think the lemongrass threw me off the most. At the same time, I𠆝 be willing to write that Fabio’s dish looked the most appetizing if it meant that a giant slab of his homemade ricotta would magically appear in my fridge.

NEXT: Something called “scallibut” goes over surprisingly well

Bourdain called Fabio 𠇊 really talented cook who got hopelessly lost in the forest,” and the judges agreed that Tiffany’s crudo of summer flounder was too common. But they loved Angelo’s �llsy” marinated fish with smoked chorizo and white chocolate, and thought Mike’s salmon and eggplant dish was solid. David Chang summed up the chefs’ offerings: “Nothing I would be embarrassed about.” Hey, high praise!

At Townhouse, home of avant-garde chef David Burke, Antonia’s peas-and-carrots idea worked out so well Burke said he𠆝 consider serving it, while Jamie’s tomato and bacon soup (surprise! Jamie made soup) was just average. 𠇌ould have been more ‘wow’ factor for my style,” said Burke. I had low expectations for the judges’ reception of Casey’s “halibut scallop,” or what Kate Krader called “scallibut,” if only because the word combination and the way “scallop” appeared in quotes reminded me of mildly creepy WHAT IS IT? foods such as tofurkey or imitation crab. But they loved it! Unfortunately, Happy Dale’s crazy breakfast was a disaster. I have to include this description too because it’s just wild. “Roasted veal loin, peanuts, popcorn, French toast, corn, and thyme caramel.” Good God! This is total stoner food (give or take the thyme).

Marcel did his own little segment about “having beef” with Wylie because one of Wylie’s sous chefs had accused him of culinary plagiarism. “Here I am having to create a dish in their style,” he said. “I mean, it’s too much. You can’t even write this sort of stuff.” But honey … I think Top Chef just did!

50, Angry Dale (who was not angry at all this week, which is just as well because now we’ll get to call him simply �le”) offered his version of breakfast with a sunny-side-up egg dumpling that delighted Wylie Dufresne. You could almost see the new crop of egg-based fantasies whirling in his oddball brain. I loved how he arrived at 𠇋uttered toast” after letting the flavors settle. Very cute. Marcel’s Vadouvan lamb, inspired by Wylie’s aerated foie gras, went over okay — at least the judges appreciated his attempted use of “the equipment back there.” Well-played, sir. Carla’s poached shrimp was “nice,” but a little safe. Redhead Tiffani’s 𠇋roken summer heirloom melons” were “the intruder of the party,” according to Bourdain. Said Dufresne (ooh, they rhyme), “It felt just a little murky.”

NEXT: Bourdain calls Dufresne an 𠇎gg Slut”

Back at the Wine Cellar of Doom, Stephen poured wine. Of course he did! He was doomed. Angry Dale, Angelo, Tre, and Antonia were called in as the top four, then Dale and his beige baseball cap won a six-night trip to New Zealand. (Take that, Oprah.) “Were you aware that Wylie Dufresne is a notorious Egg Slut?” Bourdain asked Dale. Oh, you bet he was. (Egg Slut. )

Bottom four: Stephen, Tiffani, Fabio, Happy Dale. Tom used the word texturally twice, prompting me to love him twice as hard as I already did. In the end, Stephen’s “unpleasant to eat” salmon was a no-brainer for elimination — not to mention Stephen’s repeated insistence that he was an 𠇎xpert” on Italian food. “I have great knowledge of Led Zeppelin,” said Tom the dirty hippie. 𠇍oesn’t make me Jimmy Page.” Aw, don’t sell yourself short, Tom!

Tom’s metaphor for Happy Dale wasn’t quite as well-thought-out, but I guess neither was H.D.’s breakfast dish with veal on it, so that makes sense. “If your inspiration was the circus, we ended up with caramel popcorn and not much of a surprise.” At least Happy Dale, happy ’til the end, was able to joke about the situation right away (or whenever they taped that interview): “Maybe I’ll come back for Top Chef 16: Seniors.” He will apparently age at a more rapid pace following elimination. See you in 2018, old man!

𠇏ood with jazz hands” forever!

Discuss last night’s show below, and don’t miss this week’s installment from our guest blogger Padma Lakshmi, who lets us know just how god-awful Stephen’s salmon fondito really was. “It was the most revolting thing,” she says. “It tasted like soap.” [PopWatch]


The Plant Based Chef

Due to increased demand and interest in healthy eating I have gone online with a new website www.theplantbasedchef.org. This site is devoted entirely to plant based eating. So many of my clients ask for special dietary needs and for healthy eating options I felt that this is a natural progression for my services to take. I am also very passionate about what we eat, the way that it is produced and the impact that this is having on our individual health, the health of our communities and the health of our planet.

Vegan Salad of Tomatoes, Baby artichokes and Beets. Italy 2015

The Plant based Chef is about eating less animals and their products and more plants. There is truly no reason why plant based food cannot be wonderful, tasty and healthy. As chef with well over twenty years of experience in the world of professional cookery I want to change the way we all view plant based eating. The world of plant based food is rich and varied. Look closely all of the great cuisines of the world and they offer a platform of exceptional seasonal vegetable, fruit and grain based cookery that is the foundation of the worlds great civilisations.

Its your choice to decide how you wish to eat, as an omnivore, as a vegetarian or vegan. I understand that changing to more of a vegetarian, vegan or plant based diet is difficult in the "meat-centric" world that we inhabit today. It is far easier to accept what is commonly seen as "normal" but I want to challenge what "normal" is and the way that we interact with our food and each other. My aim is provide you with plant based recipes and ideas that will lead you further down the path of using more and more fruits, vegetables and grains in you everyday eating. For your healths sake and for the sake of the planet we should all be trying to eat less animal based and processed foods. The recipes and ideas in this website hopefully will help and encourage a healthier way of eating whether you are an omnivore or herbivore.

Chickpea Pancake, Fresh Porcini, baby onions and almond cream. (Vegan Gluten Free) Italy 2015


Chef David Burke’s Simple Salad Ideas - Recipes

Chetna Macwan

Founder, “Spice Culture Cooking”

On the menu: Jeera Chicken

Wednesday, October 7th

6:00 P.M. EST

Barret Beyer

Chef, Hell’s Kitchen Season 11

On the menu: Wild Mushroom and Asiago Truffle Risotto

Wednesday, September 30th

6:00 P.M. EST

Jennie Werts

Executive Chef and Co-Owner, Ellen’s on Front

On the menu: Chicken Fried Rice

Wednesday, September 23rd

6:00 P.M. EST

Executive Chef, Facebook NY

On the menu: Pork and Beef with Cabbage Dumplings

Wednesday, September 16th

6:00 P.M. EST

Roger Mulligan

The Capital Grille

On the menu: Beerducation: a lesson on beer and its history!

Wednesday, September 9th

Christine Galan

Baker & Owner, Christy’s Rum Cakes

On the menu: Grand Marnier Soufflè with Orange Crème Anglaise

Wednesday, September 2nd

Jessica Scott

Corporate Executive Pastry Chef, 50 Eggs Hospitality Group

On the menu: Mixed Berry Cobbler with Brown Sugar Oat Crumble and Salted Bourbon Caramel Sauce

Wednesday, August 26th

John Cleveland

Executive Chef, Post & Beam, alongside Revel Spirits for cocktails

On the menu: Roasted Vegetable Collard Wrap along with summer cocktails from Revel Spirits

Wednesday, August 19th

David Hersh

Chef and Owner, Rooted Hospitality Group

On the menu: Fennel Salad and Pan Seared Bronzini with Parsnip Purée and a Balsamic Reduction

Wednesday, August 12th

Erika Cline

Pastry Chef, Bleu Chocolat

On the menu: Tiramisu

Wednesday, August 5th

Rob Maloney

Mixologist, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse

On the menu: Bacon Wrapped Figs with a Blood Orange Martini, Sparkling Pink Lemon Drop, and Cucumber-Basil Gimlet

Wednesday, July 29th

Wrennie West

General Manager, Revel Spirits

On the menu: En Mi Casa, Revel Siesta, Avila Old Fashioned

Wednesday, July 22nd

David Burke

Chef and Restaurateur, David Burke Hospitality Management

On the menu: Poached Chicken with Ratatouille Orzo Ragout

Wednesday, July 15th

Ralph Scamardella

Chef/Partner, Tao Group

On the menu: The Five Families: Pasta al Filetto di Pomodoro, Amatriciana, Arrabbiata, a la Vodka, Boscaiola

Wednesday, July 8th

Sous Chef, Red Rooster Harlem

On the menu: Heirloom Tomato Salad, Whole Roasted Snapper Fish, and Peach Foster

Wednesday, July 1st

Dan Fernandez

Mixologist, The Capital Grille

On the menu: Delicious Summer Cocktails

Thursday, June 25th

Chris Nirschel

Chef, CEO/Chef at NY Catering Company

On the menu: Chicken Picatta

About our Chefs and Mixologists

Chef Chris Nirschel

Chris Nirschel
NY Catering Service
Chef and CEO

Chef Chris is the Founder and CEO of Culinary Bad Boy Productions and NY Catering Service, a New York based catering service. Influenced by his family’s heritage, which ranges from Argentinean, Italian and French, Chef Chris began his culinary career at The French Culinary Institute in 2009, where he became classically trained in French and Italian cuisines. Chef Chris since then has trained all over the world and loves creating unique, beautiful, dishes that pair perfectly with selected wines or mixology cocktails

Chef Chris has cooked in several acclaimed NYC restaurants such as Celsius at Bryant Park, World Yacht, North River, to mention a few, and cooks for notables such as Puff Daddy, Chaka Khan, Jason Kidd and Orlando Magic. His reputation and clientele continues to grow with every dinner, event or specialized experience.

Chef Chris is a brand ambassador for Gotham Steel and can be seen on QVC. He often appears on networks such as CNN, NBC, Dr. Oz, Fox & Friends, Martha Stewart Radio, the Daily Connection, Better TV and The Daily. His culinary competitions include Food Network Season 7 (Finalist), Chopped All Stars, and MTV’s House of Food, which he has also hosted. Chef Chris has been featured in ZAGAT, Manhattan Magazine and among several other publications. Each year Chef Nirschel participates in the Food Network’s Annual Food & Wine Festival in New York, Atlantic City, and Miami.

Now Chef has unique clients from various marketing, public relations, management and concierge companies allowing every aspect of creativity to ensue. There is nothing NY Catering Service and Chef Chris Nirschel cannot do.

Chef Ralph Scamardella

RALPH SCAMARDELLA
TAO Group
Chef/Partner

After nearly three decades in the kitchens of the most esteemed restaurants in the world, Ralph Scamardella serves as Partner and Chef of TAO Group, overseeing all chefs and concepts in New York (TAO Uptown, TAO Downtown, LAVO Italian Restaurant, food & beverage at Dream Downtown and Dream Midtown, and food & beverage at Moxy Times Square including Legasea, a seafood brasserie) Las Vegas (TAO Asian Bistro at The Venetian, TAO Beach and LAVO Italian Restaurant at The Palazzo) and Los Angeles (TAO, Luchini, and food & beverage at Dream Los Angeles).

As the son of Italian immigrants, Scamardella developed an affinity for cooking with fresh ingredients early on, enjoying seasonal produce as staples in the family’s cooking within their Brooklyn kitchen.

Scamardella began his studies at New York City’s Technology Institute, learning to master the business of hotel and restaurant management while simultaneously building his culinary skills at The Plaza Hotel’s French restaurant. He then moved on to hone his skills with one of the world’s true master chefs, working under mentor Daniel Boulud at Polo Restaurant.

Paving the way to distinction early, he received a two-star rating from The New York Times at Vanessa’s restaurant, where he served as Executive Chef. Scamardella went on to have a large hand in the success of the opening and driving concept behind Carmine’s, as chef and partner. After nearly 15 years and several successful projects, he left the kitchen to consult for restaurants such as The Strip House, Harrah’s Casino, and Cessca.

Upon joining TAO Group in 2007 as Corporate Executive Chef and Partner, Scamardella opened LAVO Italian Restaurant and TAO Beach in Las Vegas. He then went on to open LAVO Italian Restaurant in New York, as well as TAO Downtown in Chelsea, Bodega Negra at Dream Downtown, The Rickey and Fishbowl at Dream Midtown, the Los Angeles locations of TAO and new brand, Luchini as well as Legasea and Magic Hour Rooftop Bar & Lounge at Moxy Times Square. In 2018, Scamardella helped open LAVO Singapore, atop the iconic Marina Bay Sands SkyPark. TAO Group’s most recent U.S. expansion introduced TAO Asian Bistro & Nightclub to Chicago, in September 2018.

Chef Tiana Gee

Chef Tiana Gee

Sous Chef/Private Chef/TV Personality

Chef Tiana Gee is a Los Angeles native who knew from childhood that her enthusiasm for food would be her calling in life. Chef Tiana took cooking and baking classes from a young age beginning in middle school and throughout high school. In high school, she was able to compete for culinary scholarships with the Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP). After completing the competition she graduated with a few scholarships to various culinary programs. Chef Tiana has worked at some notable restaurants in the Los Angeles area and developed a skill set that led her to New York City to become a Sous Chef at the world-renowned Red Rooster in Harlem owned by Celebrity Chef Marcus Samuelsson.

Chef Tiana has a channel on YouTube called Cookin’ With Tee where she demonstrates recipes and techniques for viewers so that they can cook delicious meals in the comfort of their own home. Known in the industry for her sharp skills and charismatic personality, Chef Tiana is being courted for several cooking shows across the country.

Chef David Burke

David Burke

Chef and Restaurateur, David Burke Hospitality Management

Fueled by passion, grit, and a knack for artful innovation, David Burke is one of the best known and most respected chefs in modern American cuisine.

Considered a leading pioneer in American cooking, Burke, a New Jersey native, is also recognized internationally for his revolutionary techniques, exceptional skills, successful restaurant empire, and his many TV appearances. In the parlance of today’s celebrity-driven culture, he is a rock star of the culinary world.

At just 26, Burke’s kitchen mastery won him the executive chef position of New York City’s legendary River Cafe. While there, he became the first American ever to win the prestigious Meilleurs Ouvriers de France Diplome d’Honneur, cementing his reputation as a leading international chef. He subsequently won Japan’s Nippon Award for Excellence, the Robert Mondavi Award of Excellence, and two nominations for James Beard Best Chef. Burke was also awarded a coveted three-star New York Times review for the River Café and later became a familiar guest on TV’s Top Chef.

Looking for fresh opportunities, Burke eventually set his sights on a new goal – restaurant ownership. He opened many with the founder of the iconic Smith & Wollensky steakhouse brand and later formed a hospitality company with partners, which owned and operated numerous award-winning restaurants around the country. It was during this period he gained U.S. patents for several innovations, including his famous Himalayan salt aging process for beef. Always progressing, Burke created his own company, David Burke Group, with several sub-companies including DB Global and David Burke Hospitality Management, which owns and manages, licenses, and consults with restaurants, hotels, clubs, and schools.

Burke is the author of two cookbooks, Cooking With David Burke, and David Burke’s New American Classics.

Chef Burke’s honors and awards are too numerous to catalog but include such notable recognition as:

  • Meilleurs Ouvriers de France Diplome d’Honneur. The only American to win this honor
  • Japan’s Nippon Award of Excellence
  • Robert Mondavi Award of Excellence
  • Culinary Art Institute’s August Escoffier Award
  • James Beard Foundation Who’s Who in Culinary Arts
  • Nation’s Restaurant News awarded him with the Menu Masters Award
  • New Jersey Red Cross Clara Barton Humanitarian of the Year
  • James Beard Foundation Best Chef New York

Time Out New York Best Culinary Prankster

Pastry Chef Erika Cline

Pastry Chef Erika Cline

Pastry Chef, Bleu Chocolat

Over the past 25+ years, celebrated pastry chef Erika Cline has crafted some of the country’s most scrumptious desserts and chocolates. Erika’s grand career started in Detroit Michigan as a pastry cook under the countries first Master Chef Milos. From there, Chef Cline passion for the culinary arts spanned the countryside including renowned places like The Peabody Hotel Memphis Tennessee and Ponte Vedra Country Club in Jacksonville Florida. In July 2012, Erika opened and developed the chocolate program for Graycliff Chocolatier in Nassau Bahamas. Also in the fall of 2012, Erika became one of a select few celebrity chefs to spokesperson “Sunday Dinner Chefs” for Publix Supermarkets showcasing holiday entrees and desserts for the holiday season. Throughout the years, Chef Cline showcased her culinary talents as one of the main attractions to Black EXPO located in several cities across the southeast United States and also Epcot Food and Wine in Orlando, Florida. Cline was one of the original 2010 cheftestants on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts. She won three competitions while receiving great acclaims about her cookies and tequila bombs by the top chef judges. She has been featured in the Huffington Post, the Pastry Arts Magazine, Afar Travel Magazine, Black Enterprise, and others. Chef Erika has made numerous television cooking appearances and has served as a judge for the Food Network’s Rock N Roll Pastry Challenge.

In 2008, as a devotee of the pastry arts Chef Erika created a non-profit organization entitled Culinary Wonders USA. Culinary Wonders USA’s mission is to introduce, share, and cultivate the culinary arts to minorities. As president of CWUSA, Chef Erika believes that mentoring, scholarships, and volunteerism is a great avenue for providing direction in the culinary world. While living the life of pastries across the country and Caribbean, she has supported various charity events such as The Kidney Foundation (Memphis Tennessee), Sulzbacher Center & Rhoda L. Martin Cultural Heritage Center (Jacksonville, Florida), Food as Art, the United Negro College Fund (Seattle Washington) where she has raised over $36,000 over the last 5 years by auctioning her desserts for the beloved charity, The Service Board (Seattle Washington) and Minority Chef Summit 2014 (Nassau Bahamas) (Port au Prince, Haiti 2015) and (Tortola BVI 2017).
In 2015, Chef Erika opened a chocolate boutique named Bleu Chocolat. In the fall of 2017 Hurricane Irma destroyed her home and business, Chef Erika is rebuilding her chocolate brand in Jacksonville Florida. As a James Beard alumnus and has been a featured chef at the James Beard House for the West Indies dinner 2017 and 2018 for an all-women chef dinner. In May of 2018 Chef Erika was a featured chef at the James Beard Awards gala in Chicago Illinois. Erika recently closed Bleu Chocolat Café in the neighborhood Springfield (Jacksonville Fl.) which was named one of Jacksonville’s Top 50 restaurants of 2019. Chef Erika Cline’s long-standing motto is “A day is never good without chocolate” is the trademark of an accomplished pastry chef and talented
chocolatier.

Chef David Hersh

Chef David Hersh

Chef and Owner, Rooted Hospitality Group (RHG)

Chef and owner of Rooted Hospitality Group (RHG, or Rooted), David Hersh, emerged on the restaurant scene in Hampton Bays, NY, when the company opened its first location, RUMBA, in 2010. Two years later, RHG acquired one of the most beautiful properties in the same area, injected its vision, and brought the property back to life. Cowfish opened in 2012, also in Hampton Bays, NY. Beginning in 2014, RHG acquired a property in Patchogue, NY, on the revitalized downtown Main Street, where they renovated and reconstructed a one-story restaurant into a tri-level space that includes the only rooftop dining terrace in the area. RHUM, sister restaurant to RUMBA, opened its doors in 2016. Other projects include AVO TACO, a unique fast-casual hybrid, located in New Hyde Park, NY, and now opening in New Orleans, LA, along with Flora, its newest dining experience, set to open summer 2020 in Westhampton Beach, NY.

Founded in 2009 by David and Rachel Hersh, Rooted Hospitality Group began with a dream to create a gathering place that paired sun, soft sand, and refreshing breezes with good drinks, chef-driven food, and great company, creating some of Long Island‘s most beloved restaurants and bars which all offer the company’s signature warmth and hospitality. It has grown to include some of the top restaurants on Long Island (and beyond!), and has earned countless awards, including Best Waterfront Restaurant, Best Dining Experience, Best Taco, Best Cocktail, and so much more.

Pastry Chef Jessica Scott

Jessica Scott

Corporate Executive Pastry Chef, 50 Eggs Hospitality Group

As Corporate Executive Pastry Chef at 50 Eggs Hospitality Group which includes CHICA (Miami, Las Vegas), Yardbird Southern Table & Bar (Miami, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Singapore, and forthcoming locations in Dallas and DC), and Spritz Restaurant & Bar at The Venetian Las Vegas, Jessica Scott shares her passion for creative and over-the-top desserts across multiple concepts and menus. Staying true to the 50 Eggs mission, Jessica is pushing the boundaries with her innovative desserts, bringing a refined yet approachable style to the pastry program across all 50 Eggs brands.

With a relentless commitment to balancing flavor and eclectic presentations, Jessica has a reputation for being a true innovator among her pastry chef peers. Hailing from San Diego, California, she developed her passion for the sweet and savory at an early age. Trained at The Art Institute of California, she served as the executive pastry chef at Puesto, an award-winning Mexican artisanal kitchen & bar, from 2015 to 2018, and stole the spotlight when her “Churro Éclair” became a viral sensation o vernight. Before joining the 50 Eggs team, Jessica served as the executive corporate pastry chef at Barton G. where she was responsible for conceptualizing and developing new desserts for all locations across the U.S.

Naturally competitive, Jes sica has always seized the opportunity to express her creativity through her work and challenge those around her. She was awarded the prestigious Jeune Professional Award from the L’Academie de Gastronomie Brillat-Savarin and The Chaine des Rotisseurs Foundation for her whimsical approach to pastry arts. In 2007, she was chosen to be part of the Denver FIVE, an exclusive team of top chefs focused on pop-up dinners. Together, the team drew rave reviews at the Aspen Food and Wine Classic, which led to an exclusive invitation to produce a featured dinner at the esteemed James Beard House in New York City. Her list of accolades and impressive achievements in the pastry world continued in 2016 when she won the “Best for Last” Best Dessert Award at the annual

Hotel del Coronado Grand Chef Throwdown followed by a 2017 win at the Food Network’s Dessert Games. Jessica was also a finalist in the Food Network’s Halloween Baking Championship, and in 2018, she won the “Best Design” at San Diego’s annual Creations in Chocolate Event.

When she’s not inventing the next mind-blowing dessert, Jessica is an active voice in the local community. She shares her experiences as a female chef, mentors young cooks, and teaches baking skills to the public.

Chef Eton Chan

Executive Chef, Facebook NY

I was raised in Chicago, where my parents owned a Chinese restaurant called House of Fortune. Worked every facet of the restaurant you can imagine, not thinking too much of it, just helping out the family biz. Fast forward to 2001, I just graduated from Rutgers University and took the first job I landed…..being a Stockbroker in NYC. While I was doing this, I found myself cooking a lot after work… making Chicken and Broccoli, Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Nutella Crepes, basically everything I can remember growing up in my parent’s restaurant and eating my grandmother’s home cooking. After about 4 years of brokerage life, I took a 180 and enrolled at the French Culinary Institute for a part-time 9-month program, this would allow me to get my foot in the door for my next career.

My first NYC restaurant job was at En Japanese Brasserie, where I not only learned how to hustle and cook Japanese Pub fare, I discovered a new comradery in the kitchen that I never realized back in the House of Fortune days or ever in work life.

It was a great starting point, and then I started really getting deep into who’s who in the NY restaurant scene and went to work on the line for the late Gray Kunz at Cafe Gray in the Time Warner Center. There I truly learned the “elements of taste” through his fine-tuned marriage of global flavors.

The next stop was Asiate at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. I worked through all the stations as a tournament in what would be a flavor profile I would develop as my own – Asian Centric. I went onto Southgate at the Essex House after 2 years with the Asiate family. At Southgate, I would meet Chef Nate Eckhaus, who’d end up changing my life years later.

Soo…..8 years out of college, 4 years out of culinary school…I decided to open up my own restaurant called Eton in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. The menu was simple, Dumplings & Hawaiian Shave Ice in the warm months and Dumplings & Hand-Pulled Noodles in the cold months. I got to fill the dumplings with whatever I wanted, cause it was mine. We made classic dumplings and also experimental ones like beet and goat cheese to ginger scallion crab cake dumplings. Eton had a lot of accolades from NY Times to Time Out NY and soon we opened 2 more locations in Brooklyn, came out with a line of frozen dumplings that were sold in the freezer aisle of grocery stores in NYC. Also created a smaller venture called “Big Bao” that started in the Brooklyn Flea and Smorgasbord, which sold fist-sized steamed buns filled with everything from BBQ Pork to Spiced Pumpkin Custard. Things were great, except in the home front.

I needed a better work-life balance, all this was impossible to operate because I was the one executing each aspect of my business. Just when I lost all passion in my business and calling it quits, I reached out to Nate to see what he was doing. He told me that he was opening up the first cafe for Facebook in NY. I was interested in working with him again and seeing what this new culinary adventure would bring.

About 6 years to the present, I’d moved from a Kitchen Manager to Sous Chef, to Executive Sous, to Cafe Chef, to Executive Chef, and now Area Chef for my building in NYC. I oversee 5 different concepts that serve our FB employees breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The most incredible part of this journey is that I can enjoy my personal life to a point I thought I’d never been able to reach and hit professional achievements I thought would take forever to accomplish.

Chef Jennie Werts

Jennie Werts

Executive Chef & Co-Owner, Ellen’s on Front

Jennie Werts is an award-winning chef and graduate of the International Culinary Center (Formerly the French Culinary Institute). She began her career in kitchens on the North Fork of Long Island, working summers during college. She has since held senior positions working with chefs including Tom Valenti at Ouest and Richard Sandoval at Zengo, where she served as Chef de Cuisine. She recently served as Chef de Cuisine and founder of Wolfert’sRoost in Irvington, NY, experiencing the process of opening a restaurant, from kitchen and menu design to the front of house management. Through Jennie’s work, Wolfort’s Roost was awarded Best New Restaurant in Westchester County (link). In the summer of 2017, Jennie opened a pop-up restaurant at the Drossos Motel snack bar, Jennie’s at Drossos, which continues to operate seasonally. In 2019, Jennie opened Ellen’s on Front, a year-round restaurant in Greenport, serving her specialty, elevated comfort food, taking American classics to the next level through innovative cross-cultural twists using fresh and local ingredients.

Chef Barret Beyer

Chef Barret Beyer

Chef Barret Beyer epitomizes new beginnings and change, inspiring millions with his cooking and actions. While working in New York City’s financial industry and boom era during the aughts, Beyer was arrested ten times for charges that ranged from selling drugs, Conspiracy to forgery, even overdosing and waking up on life support after 2 days in 2006. For ten years, from 1998 until 2008, he was in and out of jails. However coinciding with the birth his daughter in 2008, the reality TV star finally got sober. Beyer said, “I couldn’t do it anymore. I wanted to be a father she could look up to.” He did. Leaving the world of finance and clanging cells bars behind, the love of cooking become the inspiration for his life’s next course. Always a home cook, Beyer attended culinary school in his native Long Island. Before even graduating the ambitious New Yorker already had a job as a sous chef.

Beyer then made it to “Hell’s Kitchen” with the legendary kitchen screamer Gordon Ramsey. His favorite television experience. Although, he didn’t win the show, Beyer realized that working in the kitchen is the work he loves. It’s that drive to succeed and healthy ambition which drove him to participate in “Cutthroat Kitchen”, another on-camera cooking competition. “I was the first one cut. It was for not putting the chicken on a Chicken Caesar Salad,” the chef says while chuckling at his folly.

From his experience on reality TV, the cheffing professional has become a consultant opening a multitude of East Coast restaurants, receiving many accolades along the way. Food & Beverage Magazine and Chef Works have both named him “Chef of The Month”, in 2013 and 2014, respectively. With his new found celebrity status, Beyer volunteers or works non-profits events around the country including Reality Rally which raises money for Michelle’s Place a Breast Cancer Resource Center in Temecula, Bullying We’re Kickin’ It which he is a Spokesperson for. has organized and raised money to cook warm meals to feed the people & first responders of Long Beach after Super storm Sandy hit. He went out to Oklahoma & teamed up with Johnsonville Sausage Company to help cook raise money & items for the victims of the F5 Tornado that ripped through Moore County. With eight years of sobriety and five years of cooking, it’s clear Chef Beyer has changed his life.

Chef Barret will continue to pursue consistent growth, creativity, and culinary development through the positive interaction of culinary leaders. For now, rest assured his strong desire to share his culinary knowledge with others, and to provide personal chef services/classes for the inexperienced cooks/chefs will rapidly establish Chef Barret’s brand and associated added value.

Chef Chetna Macwan

Chetna Macwan


David Burke

Blurring the lines between chef, artist, entrepreneur and inventor, David Burke is one of the leading pioneers in American cooking today. His fascination with ingredients and the art of the meal has fueled a thirty-year career marked by creativity, critical acclaim and the introduction of revolutionary products and cooking techniques. His passion for food and for the restaurant industry shows no signs of slowing down.

Burke graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and soon thereafter traveled to France where he completed several stages with notable chefs such as Pierre Troisgros, Georges Blanc and Gaston Lenôtre. Burke's mastery of French culinary technique was confirmed when, at age 26, he won France's coveted Meilleurs Ouvriers de France Diplome d'Honneur for unparalleled skill and creativity with his native cuisine. Burke returned to the U.S. as a sous chef for Waldy Malouf at La Cremaillere and then for Charlie Palmer at The River Café, where he ascended to executive chef and earned three stars from The New York Times.

In 1992, Burke opened the Park Avenue Café with Smith & Wollensky CEO Alan Stillman, and then, in 1996, he became vice president of culinary development for the Smith & Wollensky Restaurant Group. Burke has been honored with Japan's Nippon Award of Excellence, the Robert Mondavi Award of Excellence and the CIA's August Escoffier Award. Nation's Restaurant News named Burke one of the 50 Top R&D Culinarians and Time Out New York honored him as the "Best Culinary Prankster" in 2003. In May 2009, Burke was inducted into the Who's Who of Food & Beverage in America by the James Beard Foundation. In that same month, he also won the distinctive Menu Masters award from Nation's Restaurant News, naming him one of the nation"s most celebrated culinary innovators.

In February 2012, Burke was honored by the culinary school at Johnson & Wales University with the Distinguished Visiting Chef Award, which is given to the world's most influential and celebrated chefs. In November 2012, he was named Restaurateur of the Year by the New Jersey Restaurant Association. In the same month, he was honored with a Concierge Choice Award, celebrating the best in New York City hospitality, winning the best chef award. In 2013, Burke was nominated to "Best Chefs America," a new benchmark in American cooking whereby chefs name the peers who are the most inspiring and impressive in the business. In 2013, the David Burke Group was recognized by Restaurant Hospitality magazine as having one of the "Coolest Multiconcept Companies in the Land." The article highlights restaurant corporations with an enviable business concept that others can't wait to replicate. In addition, it cites the numerous incarnations of Chef Burke's creative vision, from David Burke Townhouse to David Burke Fishtail, from Burke in the Box to David Burke's Primehouse.

Chef Burke's vast talents have been showcased recently on television, including season two of Top Chef Masters, a guest spot on the Every Day with Rachael Ray show and as a mentor to Breckenridge Bourbon distiller Bryan Nolt on Bloomberg's small-business television series The Mentor. In 2013, he returned to season five of Top Chef Masters.

Burke's visibility as a celebrity chef has also led to consultant positions with hotels, cruise lines and food experts. Most recently, he was invited to join the Holland America Line Culinary Council alongside renowned international chefs Jonnie Boer, Marcus Samuelsson, Jacques Torres, Charlie Trotter and Elizabeth Falkner. In this capacity, Burke will consult on the cruise line's culinary initiatives, including the Culinary Arts Center enrichment program, and provide signature recipes which will be featured on all 15 ships. In 2003, Burke teamed up with Donatella Arpaia to open davidburke & donatella (now known as David Burke Townhouse, of which he has sole ownership). In 2005 came David Burke at Bloomingdale's, a dual-concept restaurant offering both a full service Burke Bar Café on one side and a Burke in the Box eat-in concept on the other.

In 2006 Burke opened up David Burke’s Primehouse in The James Hotel Chicago. His restaurant collection continued to grow that same year when he purchased culinary career began under founders Markus and Hubert Peter. His next ventures included David Burke Prime at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut and David Burke Fishtail in Manhattan, both of which opened in 2008. In February 2011, he opened David Burke Kitchen at The James Hotel New York in SoHo, bringing his signature whimsical style to downtown Manhattan.

In 2013, Burke made great strides in expanding his restaurant empire and enhancing his partnerships with other reputable companies. In the summer of 2013, he opened Burke's Bacon Bar in the James Hotel Chicago, a high-end sandwich and "to-go" concept featuring artisan and top-notch bacons from around the country. BBB features Burke's signature "Handwiches" -- palm-sized sandwiches packed with creative combinations of fresh ingredients -- as well as salads and sweets, all featuring bacon, in some form, as an ingredient. In 2014, Burke will bring his SoHo concept, David Burke Kitchen, which features modern takes on farmhouse cuisine, to the ski resort town of Aspen, Colorado.

During his tenure at The River Café, Burke began experimenting with interesting ingredients and cooking techniques. His first culinary innovations, including Pastrami Salmon (now available through Acme Smoked Fist), flavored oils and tuna tartare, revolutionized gastronomic technique. During his 12-year period at the Park Avenue Café, Burke created GourmetPops, ready-to-serve cheesecake lollipops. His Can o' Cake concept, where cake is mixed, baked and eaten from a portable tin, is used throughout his restaurants. Most recently, he teamed with 12NtM to create two non-alcoholic sparkling beverages, available in gourmet retailers such as Whole Foods and at his New York locations. Additionally, Burke is actively involved with culinology, an approach to food that blends the culinary arts and food technology. To that end, he is the chief culinary advisor to the Skinny Eats line of flavor-enhancing produtts.

In 2011, Burke received the ultimate honor presented to inventors: a United States patent. It was awarded to him for the unique process by which he uses pink Himalayan salt to dry-age his steaks. Burke lines the walls of his dry-aging room with brickes of the alt, which imparts a subtle flavor to the beef and renders it incredibly tender. Burke's steaks can be dry-aged for anywhere from 28 to 55, 75, or even as long as 100 days using this process.

Burke's first cookbook, Cooking with David Burke, and his second, David Burke's New American Classics launched in April 2006. He is currently working on his third book, due out in 2015.

Curtis Stone

Curtis Stone

Curtis Stone (curtisstone.com) is an internationally known chef, TV host, entrepreneur and New York Times bestselling author. His philosophy to cook as Mother Nature intended inspires Curtis to keep his recipes simple, using local, seasonal and organic ingredients and allowing the food to speak for itself. Curtis is recognized around the globe for his ability to help home cooks find confidence in the kitchen with delicious, doable recipes and easy cooking techniques.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Curtis first found his passion for food whilst watching his grandmother make her legendary fudge and his mother roast her perfect pork crackling. He quickly learnt to appreciate the beauty of creating -- and eating -- homemade food and cherished the way it brought people together. That early lesson would ultimately become Curtis' ethos and the foundation of his culinary career.

After finishing culinary school, he took a job cooking at the Savoy Hotel in Melbourne before heading to London, where he honed his skills under legendary three-star Michelin genius, Marco Pierre White, at Café Royal, Mirabelle. and the highly revered Quo Vadis.

Curtis opened a multi-functional culinary headquarters in Beverly Hills in January 2014, featuring a test kitchen and his dream, little restaurant, Maude (mauderestaurant.com).

While living in London, Curtis appeared in several UK cooking shows before catching the eye of television producers in Australia. At the age of 27, he became the star of a new cooking series called Surfing the Menu. It was an international hit that led to his first American show, TLC’s Take Home Chef in 2006 -- the same year the blondhaired, blue-eyed young gun was named one of People magazine's Sexiest Men Alive. Curtis broke into US primetime network television with appearances on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice, America's Next Great Restaurant and The Biggest Loser. In 2012, Curtis co-hosted Bravo’s Around the World in 80 Plates and reprised his role as host of the network's popular culinary competition Top Chef Masters, which returned for a fifth season in 2013. In addition to this, Curtis is host of the new edition of the Top Chef franchise, Top Chef Duels, scheduled to air this summer. As a frequent guest since ABC’s The Chew's launch in September 2011, Curtis officially joined the ensemble cast as a regular guest co-host in November 2013.

As the author of five cookbooks, Curtis has shared his culinary know-how with readers around the globe. Surfing the Menu and Surfing the Menu Again (ABC Books 2004, 2005), penned with his friend and fellow Aussie chef Ben O’Donoghue, were followed by Cooking with Curtis (Pavilion 2005), a solo effort that celebrated seasonal fare and brought his chef's expertise down-to-earth for the home cook. Setting out to prove that good food doesn't need to be fussy, Curtis then released Relaxed Cooking with Curtis Stone: Recipes to Put You in My Favorite Mood (Clarkson Potter 2009).

Curtis launched his fifth cookbook, a New York Times best-seller: What's For Dinner?: Recipes for a Busy Life in April 2013 (Ballantine). His sixth cookbook is set for release in April 2015. Curtis also contributes to a variety of food and lifestyle magazines. He is a food columnist for the wildly popular O Magazine, contributing on a bimonthly basis. His debut column was published in the October 2013 issue.

Curtis developed Kitchen Solutions, a line of sleek and functional cookware, in 2007 after spending thousands of hours with home cooks in their own kitchens. The goal is to bring confidence to the kitchen with tools that help make cooking inspired and effortless. The first chef to debut an eponymous product line at Williams-Sonoma, Curtis has expanded the range to include close to 250 items, which in addition to Williams-Sonoma are available at HSN, Bloomingdales, Dillard's, Chef's Catalog, Belk and fine specialty retailers throughout the US, Canada, Mexico, Australia, Singapore and Belgium.

Curtis' restaurant Maude (mauderestaurant.com) is the culmination of all his life and career experiences captured into an intimate setting. Curtis always dreamed of opening his own restaurant so when the perfect space in Beverly Hills became available, he jumped at the chance to make it his own. Curtis' passion project Maude, named after his grandmother, offers a market driven, prix-fixe monthly menu designed to create an intimate chef's table experience for the entire dining room, where every seat is within a comfortable distance to the open kitchen. Each month a single ingredient inspires a menu of nine tasting plates, and this celebrated ingredient is creatively woven, to varying degrees, through each course.

Curtis has fostered long-term relationships with charities around the world, including Feeding America in the US and Cottage by the Sea and Make-A-Wish in Australia. He currently lives in Los Angeles with his wife, actress Lindsay Price, two-year-old son, Hudson, and golden retriever Sully. In his spare time he enjoys hiking, gardening, surfing -- and cooking. For Curtis, cooking always brings fun. "There really is no better gift than a home-cooked meal and enjoying a good laugh around the table."

Gail Simmons

Gail Simmons

Gail Simmons is a trained culinary expert, food writer, and dynamic television personality. Since the show’s inception in 2006, she has lent her extensive expertise as permanent judge on Bravo’s Emmy-winning series Top Chef, currently in its 18th season. She is also the host of the upcoming series Top Chef Amateurs, giving talented home cooks the opportunity of a lifetime to test their skills in the illustrious Top Chef kitchen. A familiar face in the Top Chef franchise, she served as head critic on Top Chef Masters, hosted Top Chef Just Desserts and was a judge on Universal Kids’ Top Chef Jr. Gail hosts Iron Chef Canada and was co-host of The Feed on FYI.

Her first cookbook, Bringing It Home: Favorite Recipes from a Life of Adventurous Eating, was released by Grand Central Publishing in October 2017. Nominated for an IACP award for Best General Cookbook, it features accessible recipes and smart techniques inspired by Gail’s world travels. Gail’s first book, a memoir titled Talking With My Mouth Full, was published by Hyperion in February 2012.

From 2004 to 2019 Gail was Special Projects Director at Food & Wine magazine. During her tenure she wrote a monthly column, helped create the video series #FWCooks and worked closely with the country’s top culinary talent on events and chef-related initiatives, including overseeing the annual F&W Classic in Aspen, America’s premier culinary event. Prior to working at Food & Wine, Gail was the special events manager for Chef Daniel Boulud’s restaurant empire.

Born and raised in Toronto, Canada, Gail moved to New York City in 1999 to attend culinary school at what is now the Institute of Culinary Education. She then trained in the kitchens of legendary Le Cirque 2000 and groundbreaking Vong restaurants and worked as the assistant to Vogue's esteemed food critic, Jeffrey Steingarten.

In 2014, Gail and her business partner Samantha Hanks, founded Bumble Pie Productions, an original content company dedicated to discovering and promoting new female voices in the food and lifestyle space. Their first series, Star Plates—a collaboration with Drew Barrymore’s Flower Films and Authentic Entertainment—premiered in Fall 2016 on the Food Network.

In addition, Gail is a weekly contributor to The Dish On Oz and makes frequent appearances on NBC’s TODAY, ABC’s Good Morning America, and the Rachael Ray Show, among others. She has been featured in publications such as People, New York Magazine, Travel + Leisure, Conde Nast Traveler, GQ, Entertainment Weekly, US Weekly, Los Angeles Times, and was named the #1 Reality TV Judge in America by the New York Post.

In February 2013, Gail was appointed Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Babson College, a mentoring role where she works with student entrepreneurs, helping them develop food-related social enterprises. In April 2016, she received the Award of Excellence by Spoons Across America, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating children about the benefits of healthy eating. She is an active board member and supporter of City Harvest, Hot Bread Kitchen, Common Threads, and the Institute of Culinary Education.

Gail currently lives in New York City with her husband, Jeremy and their children, Dahlia and Kole.

Hugh Acheson

Hugh Acheson

Hugh Acheson returns as a judge for for the twelfth season of Top Chef as a series judge. A competitor on Top Chef Duels as a series judge. A competitor on Top Chef Masters Season 3, Hugh is the chef/owner of Five & Ten, The National, Cinco y Diez, Empire State South and The Florence. In addition, Acheson also serves as a series judge on Bravo's newest culinary competition series, Top Chef Duels.

Born and raised in Ottawa, Canada Hugh started cooking at a young age and decided to make it his career. At age 15, he began working in restaurants after school and learning as much as possible. Today, Hugh's experience includes working under Chef Rob MacDonald where he learned stylized French cuisine, wine and etiquette at the renowned Henri Burger restaurant in Ottawa as well as in San Francisco as the chef de cuisine with Chef Mike Fennelly at Mecca, and later as opening sous-chef with famed Chef Gary Danko at his namesake restaurant.

Taking these experiences, Hugh developed a style of his own forging together the beauty of the South with the flavors of Europe and opening the critically acclaimed Athens, GA, restaurant Five & Ten in March of 2000. Hugh went on to open The National, with fellow chef Peter Dale, in 2007. His Atlanta-based restaurant Empire State South opened in 2010 and most recently, in 2014 Hugh opened both Cinco y Diez, in Athens, and The Florence in Savannah.

Hugh's fresh approach to Southern food has earned him a great deal of recognition including Food & Wine's Best New Chef (2002), the AJC Restaurant of the Year (2007), a 2007 Rising Star from StarChefs.com and winner of their Mentor Award in 2012, and a six-time James Beard nominee for Best Chef Southeast (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012) and winner in 2012. Chef Mario Batali chose Hugh as one of the 100 contemporary chefs in Phaidon Press' Coco: 10 World Leading Master Choose 100 Contemporary Chefs.

In addition to running three restaurants, Hugh has published two cookbooks. His first, titled A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented for your Kitchen, was published by Clarkson Potter in the fall of 2011 and won the James Beard Award for Best American Cookbook in 2012. His second, titled Pick a Pickle: 50 Recipes for Pickles, Relishes and Fermented Snacks came out in the spring of 2014. He is in the process of writing his third, which is due out in 2015.

Wolfgang Puck

Wolfgang Puck

The name Wolfgang Puck is synonymous with the best of restaurant hospitality and the ultimate in all aspects of the culinary arts. The famous chef has built an empire that encompasses three separate Wolfgang Puck entities: Wolfgang Puck Fine Dining Group, Wolfgang Puck Catering, and Wolfgang Puck Worldwide, Inc.

Puck began cooking at his mother's side as a child. She was a chef in the Austrian town where he was born, and with her encouragement, Wolfgang began his formal training at 14 years of age. As a young chef he worked in some of France's greatest restaurants, including Maxim's in Paris, the Hotel de Paris in Monaco, and the Michelin 3-starred L'Oustau de Baumanière in Provence. At the age of 24, Wolfgang took the advice of a friend and left Europe for the United States. His first job was at the restaurant La Tour in Indianapolis, where he worked from 1973 to 1975.

Wolfgang came to Los Angeles in 1975 and very quickly garnered the attention of the Hollywood elite as chef and eventually part owner of Ma Maison in West Hollywood. His dynamic personality and culinary brilliance that bridged tradition and invention made Ma Maison a magnet for the rich and famous, with Wolfgang as the star attraction. He had an innate understanding of the potential for California cuisine, and was pivotal in its rise to national attention during the late 1970s.

From Ma Maison, Wolfgang went on to create his first flagship restaurant, Spago, originally located in West Hollywood on the Sunset Strip. From its opening day in 1982, Spago was an instant success and culinary phenomenon. His early signature dishes, such as haute cuisine pizzas topped with smoked salmon and caviar, and Sonoma baby lamb with braised greens and rosemary, put him and Spago on the gourmet map, not just in Los Angeles but throughout the world. Wolfgang and Spago earned many accolades during its popular 18 years in West Hollywood, including winning the prestigious James Beard Foundation Award for Outstanding Chef of the Year, twice, in 1991 and 1998, and the James Beard Foundation Award for Restaurant of the Year in 1994. Wolfgang is the only chef to have won the Outstanding Chef of the Year Award two times.

In 1983, following the success of Spago, Puck went on to open Chinois on Main in Santa Monica. His early exposure to Southern California's multicultural population intrigued him, inspiring him to fuse the Asian flavors and products of Koreatown, Chinatown, and Thaitown with his French- and California-based cuisine in a fine dining setting. Chinois on Main brought diners a fresh and imaginative Asian-fusion menu that laid the groundwork for fusion cooking in America.

In 1989, Wolfgang opened his third restaurant, Postrio, in the Prescott Hotel off San Francisco's Union Square. Postrio also draws upon the multi-ethnic nature of its surroundings. Its contemporary American cuisine, with its emphasis on local ingredients, continues to draw rave reviews in Northern California's highly competitive culinary market.

In 1997, Wolfgang moved Spago to an elegant setting on Cañon Drive in Beverly Hills. His Beverly Hills menu blazed new ground, with a combination of updated Spago classics and newly conceived items created by the award-winning talents of Managing Partner/Executive Chef Lee Hefter and Executive Pastry Chef Sherry Yard. The seasonal menu also draws from Wolfgang's favorite childhood dishes, offering a selection of Austrian specialties such as Wienerschnitzel and Kaiserschmarren. Spago Beverly Hills recently garnered two coveted Michelin Stars, one of only three Los Angeles restaurants to achieve this accolade.

In 2006, Wolfgang opened CUT, a sleek, contemporary steakhouse at the acclaimed Beverly Wilshire, a Four Seasons Hotel. After only one year, CUT earned a prestigious Michelin star. Wolfgang has changed the way Americans cook and eat by mixing formal French techniques and Asian- and California-influenced aesthetics with the highest quality ingredients. He also has changed the face of dining in cities throughout the nation, first in Los Angeles, then in Las Vegas, where he was the first star chef to create a contemporary fine dining restaurant, paving the way for other celebrated chefs and the city's metamorphosis into a dining destination.

After opening Spago in the Forum Shops at Caesars in 1992, Wolfgang went on to open five additional restaurants including Chinois in the Forum Shops at Caesars in 1998, Postrio at The Venetian and Trattoria del Lupo in the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in 1999, Wolfgang Puck Bar & Grill at MGM Grand in 2004 and CUT at The Palazzo in 2008.

Since 2001, Wolfgang and his Fine Dining Group have opened restaurants across the United States from Atlantic City (Wolfgang Puck American Grille at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in 2006) to Maui (Spago at the Four Seasons Resort in 2001). These also include The Source in Washington, DC (2007), Wolfgang Puck Grille at MGM Grand Detroit (2007), Spago at The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch in Colorado (2007), Five Sixty by Wolfgang Puck at Reunion Tower in Dallas (2009) and Wolfgang Puck Bar & Grill at L.A. Live (2009).

Antonia Lofaso

Antonia Lofaso

Best known for her role on Top Chef Season 4, Antonia Lofaso is one of America's most loved chefs and shows off her culinary skills with her feisty Italian personality on Top Chef: All Stars.

Most recently Lofaso has gone from television personality to business owner and is currently executive chef and owner of Black Market in Studio City, California. Fans of her restaurant on the west side can now experience her creations closer to home as her brand new restaurant Scopa currently opened its doors in Venice, California.

With a lifelong passion for cooking, Lofaso chased her dreams and has managed to balance her busy career with being a single parent. She shares her secrets and tips in her book The Busy Mom's Cookbook re-released in paperback.

Lofaso attended the prestigious French Culinary Institute, and upon graduating was hired at Beverly Hills' best known restaurant, Wolfgang Puck's Spago. Under the mentorship of Executive Chef Lee Hefter, Lofaso refined her skills and technique, and spent six years working at the famed L.A. hotspot. After mastering the cuisine at Spago, Lofaso made the difficult decision to leave and pursue a new adventure. Within weeks, she was hired by SBE to run the kitchen at their new upscale L.A. supper club, Foxtail. Upon starting her new role at Foxtail, Lofaso's career encountered a monumental boom when Bravo came calling and recruited her for Season 4 of its highly acclaimed cooking competition show Top Chef. In addition to her restaurant and television experience, Lofaso can also include private chef to some of Hollywood's biggest stars in her repertoire.

She currently resides in Los Angeles with her daughter Xea.

Art Smith

Art Smith

Returning to Top Chef Masters, Chef Art Smith is the executive chef and co-owner of five restaurants, including Table fifty-two, Art and Soul, LYFE Kitchen, Southern Art, and Joanne Tratorria. Once day-to-day chef to Oprah Winfrey, the two-time James Beard Award recipient has made regular television appearances on programs such as Iron Chef America, The Today Show, Nightline, Fox News, Extra, BBQ Pitmasters, Dr. Oz, Oprah, Top Chef, and Top Chef Masters. A contributing editor to O, the Oprah Magazine, Smith is also the author of three award-winning cookbooks: Back to the Table Kitchen Life: Real Food for Real Families and Back to the Family. In addition to food, philanthropy is one of Art’s passions. In 2007 he received the Humanitarian of the year award from the James Beard Foundation. After watching himself on Top Chef Masters Season 1 and being diagnosed with diabetes, Smith underwent a complete transformation and dropped 100 pounds. Smith now watches what he eats -- six small meals a day -- and has run multiple marathons.

Brooke Williamson

Brooke Williamson

Born and raised in Los Angeles, California, Brooke Williamson has carved out an impressive résumé of leading roles and achievements, including being the youngest female chef to ever cook at the James Beard House, winning Top Chef Season 14 in Charleston, and most recently, being crowned the first winner of Tournament of Champions in spring 2020. Brooke was the runner up on Top Chef season 10 in Seattle and also competed on Top Chef Duels.

Brooke began her career as a teacher’s assistant at the Epicurean Institute of Los Angeles, followed by her first kitchen position as a pastry assistant at Fenix at the Argyle Hotel, under the tutelage of Michelin-starred Chef Ken Frank. Next, she worked her way up to sous chef at Chef Michael McCarty’s Michael’s of Santa Monica. She later staged at the renowned Daniel restaurant by Daniel Boulud in New York City. Two years later, Williamson was appointed her first executive chef position at the notable Los Angeles restaurant Boxer. Then, she opened the Brentwood eatery Zax as Executive Chef, where she began to develop her signature California-inspired cuisine and met her husband and business partner, Nick Roberts.

In 2014, the couple debuted a unique four-in-one-concept, Playa Provisions, featuring a grab-and-go marketplace, King Beach an artisanal ice cream shop, Small Batch a seafood dining spot, Dockside and an intimate whiskey bar, Grain.

Brooke works alongside Roberts creating new menus and running the front and back of house, takes her chef talents on the road to local and national food events and festivals, and regularly participates in philanthropic efforts with No Kid Hungry.

Chris "CJ" Jacobson

Chris "CJ" Jacobson

Orange County-born C.J. Jacobson grew up relatively indifferent to food but his rich life experiences eventually converged to create an intense dedication to cooking. His craft is best described as "rustic-refined" and revolves around a profound respect for the hyper-seasonal, local ingredients he brings into his kitchen at Girasol in Studio City, CA, which he conceptually collaborated on with Jorge Pultera, former manager at The Ivy, Koi and Red O.

Jacobson has always been one for a good competition, even before starring on Top Chef. He attended Pepperdine University in Malibu on a volleyball scholarship, made the U.S. National Volleyball Team, and just missed an opportunity to compete in the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney. But a professional volleyball career took him to Belgium, Israel, and the Netherlands, where he discovered food could be exciting and inspiring. Returning to L.A. after his volleyball career, Jacobson did a three-day immersion at Mélisse, the Michelin two-star restaurant in Santa Monica where he realized the kitchen would be the next arena in which he would compete. He enrolled at the Le Cordon Bleu-affiliated College of Culinary Arts in Pasadena, graduating in 2004. Jacobson's first professional job was cooking at Axe, a highly regarded restaurant with an ingredient-driven California menu. He went on to work throughout Los Angeles and as a private chef for VIPs such as Arianna Huffington and Guess clothing's Marciano family.

A bout with cancer didn't slow Jacobson down but fueled his intensity for cooking and love of life. After his first appearance on Top Chef in 2007, he assumed the position of executive chef at The Yard, a gastropub in Venice. The following year, Jacobson participated in the renowned James Beard Celebrity Chef Tour. In 2012, he staged at the world-renowned Copenhagen restaurant Noma.

When he's not in the kitchen, Jacobson enjoys music and has recently rediscovered his passion for the game of volleyball. But leisure time is scarce, as the dedicated 37-year-old chef is consumed by the study and preparation of food.

Dale Talde

Dale Talde

Chef Dale Talde has competed twice on Top Chef in season four in Chicago, and season eight, All-Stars in New York City. He also went back to the kitchen to compete on Top Chef Duels. Dale’s passion for cooking began at a young age in his native Chicago where he learned to prepare meals alongside his mother in the kitchen. The proud son of Filipino immigrants, he grew up immersed in his family’s cultural heritage, while also enjoying the life of a typical American kid.

Dale applies this distinct Asian-American experience to his menus and hospitality concepts. His tie to culture and the arts is a strong and subtle thread in all his creations. In September of 2015, Dale’s released his first cookbook, Asian American, to rave reviews. Beyond Asian American food, he has opened and consulted on projects focused on Cantonese cuisine, Japanese cuisine, Italian cuisine, traditional bar and grills, rooftops, and nightclubs. A builder and inventor at heart, he drives the creative process for his company Food Crush Hospitality. In 2019, Dale opened Goosefeather at the Tarrytown House Estate in New York, and in the following year, it was named one of Esquire’s Best New Restaurants in America. One of his upcoming projects includes the opening of Talde Noodle and Dumpling in LaGuardia Airport’s newly renovated Terminal B Headhouse.

He has also competed on Chopped, Iron Chef America, Knife Fight and was also head judge on Knife Fight season 4, as well as guest judge on both Chopped and Beat Bobby Flay. With a strong connection to media, Dale goes beyond creating brick and mortar concepts and writes screenplays, develops show treatments, and builds creative content for social media platforms and more.

David Burke

David Burke

Blurring the lines between chef, artist, entrepreneur and inventor, David Burke is one of the leading pioneers in American cooking today. His fascination with ingredients and the art of the meal has fueled a thirty-year career marked by creativity, critical acclaim and the introduction of revolutionary products and cooking techniques. His passion for food and for the restaurant industry shows no signs of slowing down.

Burke graduated from the Culinary Institute of America and soon thereafter traveled to France where he completed several stages with notable chefs such as Pierre Troisgros, Georges Blanc and Gaston Lenôtre. Burke's mastery of French culinary technique was confirmed when, at age 26, he won France's coveted Meilleurs Ouvriers de France Diplome d'Honneur for unparalleled skill and creativity with his native cuisine. Burke returned to the U.S. as a sous chef for Waldy Malouf at La Cremaillere and then for Charlie Palmer at The River Café, where he ascended to executive chef and earned three stars from The New York Times.

In 1992, Burke opened the Park Avenue Café with Smith & Wollensky CEO Alan Stillman, and then, in 1996, he became vice president of culinary development for the Smith & Wollensky Restaurant Group. Burke has been honored with Japan's Nippon Award of Excellence, the Robert Mondavi Award of Excellence and the CIA's August Escoffier Award. Nation's Restaurant News named Burke one of the 50 Top R&D Culinarians and Time Out New York honored him as the "Best Culinary Prankster" in 2003. In May 2009, Burke was inducted into the Who's Who of Food & Beverage in America by the James Beard Foundation. In that same month, he also won the distinctive Menu Masters award from Nation's Restaurant News, naming him one of the nation"s most celebrated culinary innovators.

In February 2012, Burke was honored by the culinary school at Johnson & Wales University with the Distinguished Visiting Chef Award, which is given to the world's most influential and celebrated chefs. In November 2012, he was named Restaurateur of the Year by the New Jersey Restaurant Association. In the same month, he was honored with a Concierge Choice Award, celebrating the best in New York City hospitality, winning the best chef award. In 2013, Burke was nominated to "Best Chefs America," a new benchmark in American cooking whereby chefs name the peers who are the most inspiring and impressive in the business. In 2013, the David Burke Group was recognized by Restaurant Hospitality magazine as having one of the "Coolest Multiconcept Companies in the Land." The article highlights restaurant corporations with an enviable business concept that others can't wait to replicate. In addition, it cites the numerous incarnations of Chef Burke's creative vision, from David Burke Townhouse to David Burke Fishtail, from Burke in the Box to David Burke's Primehouse.

Chef Burke's vast talents have been showcased recently on television, including season two of Top Chef Masters, a guest spot on the Every Day with Rachael Ray show and as a mentor to Breckenridge Bourbon distiller Bryan Nolt on Bloomberg's small-business television series The Mentor. In 2013, he returned to season five of Top Chef Masters.

Burke's visibility as a celebrity chef has also led to consultant positions with hotels, cruise lines and food experts. Most recently, he was invited to join the Holland America Line Culinary Council alongside renowned international chefs Jonnie Boer, Marcus Samuelsson, Jacques Torres, Charlie Trotter and Elizabeth Falkner. In this capacity, Burke will consult on the cruise line's culinary initiatives, including the Culinary Arts Center enrichment program, and provide signature recipes which will be featured on all 15 ships. In 2003, Burke teamed up with Donatella Arpaia to open davidburke & donatella (now known as David Burke Townhouse, of which he has sole ownership). In 2005 came David Burke at Bloomingdale's, a dual-concept restaurant offering both a full service Burke Bar Café on one side and a Burke in the Box eat-in concept on the other.

In 2006 Burke opened up David Burke’s Primehouse in The James Hotel Chicago. His restaurant collection continued to grow that same year when he purchased culinary career began under founders Markus and Hubert Peter. His next ventures included David Burke Prime at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut and David Burke Fishtail in Manhattan, both of which opened in 2008. In February 2011, he opened David Burke Kitchen at The James Hotel New York in SoHo, bringing his signature whimsical style to downtown Manhattan.

In 2013, Burke made great strides in expanding his restaurant empire and enhancing his partnerships with other reputable companies. In the summer of 2013, he opened Burke's Bacon Bar in the James Hotel Chicago, a high-end sandwich and "to-go" concept featuring artisan and top-notch bacons from around the country. BBB features Burke's signature "Handwiches" -- palm-sized sandwiches packed with creative combinations of fresh ingredients -- as well as salads and sweets, all featuring bacon, in some form, as an ingredient. In 2014, Burke will bring his SoHo concept, David Burke Kitchen, which features modern takes on farmhouse cuisine, to the ski resort town of Aspen, Colorado.

During his tenure at The River Café, Burke began experimenting with interesting ingredients and cooking techniques. His first culinary innovations, including Pastrami Salmon (now available through Acme Smoked Fist), flavored oils and tuna tartare, revolutionized gastronomic technique. During his 12-year period at the Park Avenue Café, Burke created GourmetPops, ready-to-serve cheesecake lollipops. His Can o' Cake concept, where cake is mixed, baked and eaten from a portable tin, is used throughout his restaurants. Most recently, he teamed with 12NtM to create two non-alcoholic sparkling beverages, available in gourmet retailers such as Whole Foods and at his New York locations. Additionally, Burke is actively involved with culinology, an approach to food that blends the culinary arts and food technology. To that end, he is the chief culinary advisor to the Skinny Eats line of flavor-enhancing produtts.

In 2011, Burke received the ultimate honor presented to inventors: a United States patent. It was awarded to him for the unique process by which he uses pink Himalayan salt to dry-age his steaks. Burke lines the walls of his dry-aging room with brickes of the alt, which imparts a subtle flavor to the beef and renders it incredibly tender. Burke's steaks can be dry-aged for anywhere from 28 to 55, 75, or even as long as 100 days using this process.

Burke's first cookbook, Cooking with David Burke, and his second, David Burke's New American Classics launched in April 2006. He is currently working on his third book, due out in 2015.


Chef David Burke’s Cool Eats For The Summer

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — When it’s pushing 90 degrees, the last thing you probably want to do is turn on your stove or oven.

David Burke, executive chef at David Burke Tavern on the Upper East Side, has some ideas for light, fresh dishes you can enjoy this summer no matter how hot it gets outside.

“With summer cool foods, you want a little bit of spice. Spice makes you sweat a little and it actually cools you off,” Burke said.

One dish is broccoli guacamole, which uses broccoli or beef jerky instead of chips as a “scooper.”

Chef David Burke’s broccoli guacamole uses broccoli instead of chips as a “scooper.” (Credit: CBS2)

Broccoli Guacamole

Ingredients:

  • 2 ripe avocados, diced
  • 3/4 cup of raw broccoli pieces (no stems), finely chopped
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1/4 cup red onion, minced
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice
  • Handful of fresh coriander (cilantro), chopped
  • Salt

Some of Burke’s other ideas include tuna carpaccio, gazpacho with a crab taco, fresh fruit and sorbet with blueberry mint jasmine tea syrup, burrata with asparagus, and watermelon tomato salad with prosciutto.


Food & Drink

By John Scroggins and Cari Martens | April 8, 2010 1:15 pm

Our 2019 Update! Ever wonder which salad dressings are the most popular? One of our most popular stories of all time is our Top Ten Most Popular Salad Dressing Flavors. Originally written in 2010, the flavors for 2019 include some perennial favorites from our original list, but show some definite expansion in boundaries as experimentation with on-trends flavors continues to dominate our experiences with food.

This list was originally based on a list provided by Mintel Menu Insights, which tracks salad-dressing popularity in restaurants. Since our original listing, we’ve expanded our sources to those flavors popular in retail grocery as well as those spotted by our behavior research partner, CultureWaves™.

All of these partners help inform our editorial staff and provide indications of which salad dressings are most popular overall. But, ultimately, it’s our editorial team that creates the Top 10 Most Popular Salad Dressing Flavor list, with a lot of research, a lot of tastings and outings to restaurants, and a little intuition.

The Top Ten Salad Dressings From 2019

You’ll find our original list from 2010 below. And if you keep scrolling, links to some of our favorite salad recipes, with dressing, of course.

  1. Ranch Dressing
  2. Caesar Dressing
  3. Buttermilk Dressing
  4. Elderberry Vinaigrette
  5. Bleu Cheese Dressing
  6. Balsamic Vinaigrettes
  7. Salsa
  8. Olive Oil
  9. Thousand Island Dressing
  10. Italian Dressing – both Creamy and Oil-Based versions of the dressing

Our Original Story: Our Picks For The Top 10 Salad Dressings in 2010

  1. Ranch Dressing
  2. Vinaigrette
  3. Caesar Dressing
  4. Italian Dressing
  5. Bleu Cheese Dressing
  6. Thousand Island Dressing
  7. Balsamic Vinaigrette
  8. Honey Mustard Dressing
  9. French Dressing
  10. Greek Dressing

Vinaigrettes, especially, have continued to expand in popularity over the years. Mintel reports that vinaigrette-style dressings are particularly appealing to restaurants because they offer the sweet-and-spicy flavor profiles customers like. The most popular flavor nuances in vinaigrettes this year include garlic, honey, lemon, raspberry and elderberry. You’ll also find more exotic variations like tarragon mustard, andouille sausage, Mandarin orange and endive/bacon.

For more insights and innovations check out CultureWaves, our partner for the latest observations in the World Thought Bank—ideas and consumer-behavior trends in the areas of entertainment, design, technology, well-being and, yes, food. And, take a look at a few of our other Hot & Cool Trends.

If you’ve seen innovative products you believe will impact our food lives in the future, let the Editor know.

Some Favorite Salad Recipes

Darlington Fried Green Tomato and BLT Salad

Fried Green Tomato BLT Salad. Photo: Lance Mellenbruch.

This Southern BLT salad features golden, crispy fried green tomatoes layered over fresh spring greens, with crumbled bacon and ripe tangy-sweet summer tomatoes. Topped with a ladle of fresh-made buttermilk dressing. Recipe here.

Toasted Pecan, Quinoa and Mustard Maple Kale Salad

Toasted Pecan, Quinoa and Mustard Maple Salad. Photo: American Pecans.

This power-packed, vegan salad combines pecans, kale, golden beets, green beans, and quinoa. Topped with a maple mustard dressing, it makes for a delicious meal, wholesome appetizer or colorful side dish! Recipe here.

Spring Greens with Apple, Farro and Elderberry Vinaigrette

Spring Greens with Apple, Farro, and an Elderberry Vinaigrette. Photo: Runamok® Maple.

The combination of elderberry maple, topping a bed of greens with slices of fresh apple and the unique flavor and texture of farro, not to mention a sprinkling of feta is refreshing, is tart and yet sweet—with all flavors working together for a perfect bite. Recipe here.

Lobster Cobb Salad

Lobster Cobb Salad. Photo: ESquared Hospitality.

This Lobster Cobb Salad comes from Chef David Burke, the critically acclaimed culinary master behind BLT Prime by David Burke in Washington, D.C. Traditional Cobbs typically have chopped greens, chicken, tomatoes, boiled eggs, and bacon and cheese, topped with a vinaigrette. Recipe here.

Caesar Salad with Homemade Croutons

Caesar Salad with Homemade Croutons. Photo: Lance Mellenbruch.

Once you find a great Caesar dressing, like in this recipe, making a great Caesar salad is no problem. Here, the crunch of the romaine is highlighted by the crispy homemade croutons and creamy dressing. Recipe here.

John Scroggins

As VP/Editor-In-Chief, John sets the overall tone and quality standards for the site's content. He's passionate about storytelling and loves exploring the history, cultural influences, and people behind the story of food. John has more than 25 years of food-industry experience, having worked in public relations, media, event production and philanthropy. He is a member of the International Association of Culinary Professionals and The International Foodservice Editorial Council. His passions beyond food are rescue dogs, ending childhood hunger and poverty, and veteran's causes.


Watch the video: Εύκολη σως γιαουρτιού (July 2022).


Comments:

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  2. Mooguzragore

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  3. Waldron

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