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Host a Lobster Feast with Zokos

Host a Lobster Feast with Zokos


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Go luxe without breaking the bank — with the help of your friends

Host an affordable lobster feast with the help of your pals!

The summer is nearing its end and we are oh so sad — the days of listless beach relaxation and pool lounging are dwindling. Our favorite summer vegetables are running their course and white as a wardrobe color of choice is nearing its expiration date. But despite the coming of fall, we're saying goodbye to summer with a bang.

Nothing screams summer like clambakes and lobster boils, but we know they can get a bit pricey, especially when you’re a large group of people. Not anymore. Zokos, the party kick-starter site that helps you enjoy better parties by sharing the costs with your friends, is ensuring that you get to have lobsters without worrying about the expenses.

Zokos and Lobster.com have come together to create friend-funded lobster bashes. What does that mean? Here’s how it works:

• A host tentatively "books" one of Lobster.com’s friend-funded parties.

• Then, the host sets up a Zokos event to organize the party and split the cost of the lobsters with their friends.

• When enough friends RSVP and commit, the host finalizes the deal with Lobster.com, using the money collected from friends.

• Then, the day of the party, the host gets a box of hard-shell live Maine lobsters delivered to any door in any ZIP code in the lower 48 states.

Brilliance in a shell, right? For the most part, lobsters are a luxury that young people enjoy, but can’t usually afford — but with Zokos and Lobster.com, price is no longer an issue.

So say sayonara to summer and hello to fall and book your next bash here!


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


BY SAVING THE LOBSTER LEFTOVERS, THE FEAST CAN BE PROLONGED

A DINNER of lobsters, splendid though it may be from the guests' point of view, often leaves a lingering sadness in the mind of the cook - particularly if he or she is an expert at picking a lobster clean. As the remains of the meal are carted out to the kitchen, a fair amount of perfectly usable lobster meat is often left behind in claws, legs, leg sockets and tail fins.

It seems a shame simply to throw away such a delicious, not to mention expensive bounty, yet that is exactly what happens when a cook has no experience at using lobster leftovers.

With a bit of patience, and the recipes that follow, this waste can be prevented. The first thing to do is to take all the lobster leavings - every scrap of carcass, innards, claws, legs and tail shells, with or without meat -and put them into a large, clean plastic bag as soon as the meal is over.

Every bit of leftover melted butter should be scraped into a suitable container and stored, along with the lobster, in the refrigerator overnight. Later, at the cook's leisure, the lobster meat can be culled, placed in a container and refrigerated until needed.

These scraps can then be added to a stew or bisque, or go into a salad for one or two persons. But that is by no means the end of the flavor - and money-saving exercise. Another possibility includes lobster stock, or essence, made by boiling the carcasses with shallots, garlic, Cognac, wine, tomato paste and tarragon - the basic seasonings of lobster a lɺmericaine.

Once this stock is made and frozen, it will provide a base for a number of quick and flavorful soups and sauces. The recipe also yields, as a byproduct, a lobster butter that can be used in making the roux that thickens such concoctions.

The following recipes all use the same trick of boiling lobster carcasses to produce either a plain or a Marblehead-style lobster stew (withclam juice).

One other trick, though, is especially worth mentioning.

If you are ever a guest at a lobster dinner, seriously consider approaching your host or hostess at table-clearing time and indicating your willingness to take home the remnants in a plastic bag.

This writer has for years kept himself supplied with lobster stock by just this tactic. On one notable occasion - a dinner for 25 people - nearly a gallon was produced from leftovers. Lobster Stock 1/2 pound butter (leftover melted butter plus fresh) #2 tablespoons chopped shallots Leftovers from four lobsters (claws, innards, legs, carcasses, shells - everything) 1/4 cup Cognac 1/2 cup dry white wine #4 tablespoons tomato paste #1 tablespoon (or as desired) dried tarragon, crushed Pinch of thyme White pepper as desired Water (or chicken stock) as needed Salt as desired (the stock should be undersalted when finished). 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep, heavy pot and cook the shallots and garlic over low heat until transparent but not browned. 2.

* Add all the lobster scraps to the pot and crush them down well with a potato masher. Raise the heat, add the Cognac and flame it. 3.

* Add wine, tomato paste, tarragon, thyme and white pepper and mix well. 4.

* Add water to barely cover, plus 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well, boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. 5.

* Strain broth and discard scraps. Cool broth quickly, uncovered, and refrigerate. When completely cold, remove the cake of recongealed lobster butter from the top and wrap and reserve it in the freezer for future use. Freeze the broth in small containers. Lobster Bisque #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 tablespoons flour #2 cups lobster stock, from recipe above #1 tablespoon tomato paste, or more, as desired #1 cup heavy cream Salt and white pepper as desired. 1.

* Melt the lobster butter over low heat, mix in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. 2.

* Add the lobster stock and, whisking constantly, bring to a boil. 3.

* Add tomato paste, whisk to dissolve it completely and add the cream. (If you add more tomato paste for color, be judicious: stop before you have made the mixture taste like tomato soup.) 4.

* Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Serve hot. Yield: 4 modest servings. Lobster Stew #4 tablespoons butter (use leftover melted butter, if any) Leftover shells from 4 lobsters Pinch of thyme Water as needed #1 cup milk #2 cups heavy cream Salt, white pepper and cayenne pepper, as desired Leftover lobster meat, as available. 1.

* Melt the butter in a deep pot, add the lobster scraps, crush them down well with a potato masher and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes. 2.

* Add water to not quite cover, bring to a boil, lower heat to moderate and cook, uncovered and stirring often, for 20 minutes. Strain off broth and discard scraps. 3.

* Put broth into a deep saucepan and boil hard until it is reduced to 1 cup. Add milk, cream, seasonings and lobster meat and heat through without boiling. Cool quickly and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days to develop flavor. Heat through (without boiling) before serving. Yield: 4 servings. For Marblehead-style lobster stew, follow the previous recipe, but add 1 8-ounce bottle of clam juice (or 1 cup home-extracted clam juice) at step 2 before adding any water. Continue with recipe as given. Lobster Fra Diavolo #1 16-ounce can tomatoes, chopped coarse, with juice #2 tablespoons fresh butter #2 tablespoons lobster butter, from recipe above #2 cloves garlic, minced #2 tablespoons Cognac 1/4 cup white wine #1 cup lobster stock, from recipe above Leftover lobster meat, as available. Salt, pepper and red pepper as desired (the dish should be hotly seasoned) 1.

* Put the tomatoes and juice into a saucepan and boil hard until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh butter. Set aside until needed. 2.

* Melt the lobster butter in a skillet and cook the garlic in it over low heat until transparent but not browned. Add Cognac and flame. 3.

* Add white wine and lobster stock and boil hard until reduced by at least half. 4.

* Add lobster meat, season to taste with salt, pepper and red pepper and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to a saucelike consistency. Serve over pasta.


Watch the video: TikTok Avatar The Last AirBender That Make The Live Action Movie Look Like Trash (May 2022).


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