New recipes

UK Considers Cutting Benefits for Drug Users and Obese People Who Refuse Treatment

UK Considers Cutting Benefits for Drug Users and Obese People Who Refuse Treatment



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Obese citizens who refuse treatment for their disability may be prohibited from receiving federal aid

Shutterstock/Africa Studio

The health department believes that the number of citizens who receive benefits based on obesity is lower than reported.

Carol Black, an advisor to the Department of Health and the Department for Work and Pensions in the UK, has launched a review to consider whether drug and alcohol abusers and the obese should lose federal benefits if they refuse treatment offered by the government.

The review, which Prime Minster David Cameron has ordered to be completed by the end of the year, is designed to “establish the role such treatable conditions play in causing worklessness and estimate the associated cost to the exchequer [the UK’s tax revenue service] and the economy.”

In 2014, 7,440 working-age residents who received federal allowances were able to do so because their disabling condition was obesity. “There were also 240 incapacity benefit and severe disablement allowance claimants, and 1,540 people claiming employment and support allowance,” according to The Guardian.

These numbers are believed to underrepresent the number of citizens who claim allowances as a result of their obesity, given that a number of them can list another condition as their main disabling condition, which may be caused or made worse by obesity.


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]


Anti-obesity medication

Anti-obesity medication or weight loss medications are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These medications alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise.

In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use. [2] [3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second medication, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". [4] It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns. [5] [6] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits. [7] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns. [3] [8]

Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents, [9] it is recommended that anti-obesity medications only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. [10] [11] [ needs update ]