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US Postal Service: ‘2016 Is an Excellent Year for Grapes… Stamps’

US Postal Service: ‘2016 Is an Excellent Year for Grapes… Stamps’

hese wine stamps were made primarily for businesses, but you can buy a roll of 10,000 stamps for $500

For the price of a few good bottles of pinot noir, you can get thousands of wine grapes stamps and support the Postal Service.

The United States Postal Service has added a new five-cent grapes stamp to its stamp portfolio in honor of the million tons of wine grapes grown in the U.S. every year and, of course, America’s abiding love for wine.

The stamps feature the artwork of John Burgoyne of West Barnstable, Massachusetts, and were designed by Derry Noyes of Washington. Burgoyne used pen, ink, and watercolor to produce the pinot noir grapes, which are believed to be one of the oldest cultivated grapes in the Vitus genus.

Though the first winery in California, which now produces the majority of wine in America, dates back to the 1700s, wine and grape cultivation have been a part of human history for many more centuries. Pinot noir, which was once exclusive to Burgundy, is now grown in a number of U.S. wine regions including California, Oregon, and New York.

The grapes stamp was created “primarily for business mailers,” according to a USPS press release, but true wine-lovers can purchase a roll of 10,000 stamps for $500 — about the same as three bottles of 2012 Kosta Browne from California’s Koplen Vineyard.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


5 Fun Ways Kids Can Help Save the United States Postal Service

First, a bit of not-so-fun news: the United States Postal Service is on the verge of a major crisis. Facing scrutiny over its financial losses, USPS has been teetering on the brink of privatization—despite having made 143 billion mail deliveries in the last year alone . Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

In response, 20 states announced federal lawsuits in order to come to the aid of USPS. The good news? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy put a pin in his plans, stating that his cuts to the postal service would wait until after the November presidential election. This sent a sigh of relief across the country just as many prepare to vote by mail during the pandemic. But many public officials warn that the fight is far from over.

Across the country, officials have threatened to decrease post office hours, shutter mail processing locations, and uproot blue mailboxes from our communities.

Kawmi Raoul, Illinois Attorney General, took to Twitter following DeJoy’s announcement and had this to say: “ I was not put at ease by the Postmaster General’s press release. Seniors relying on delivery of medication, individuals waiting on checks, and citizens who intend to vote by mail need greater assurance that they can rely on the postal system!” Others, like California Attorney General Alex Padilla, criticized that merely suspending cuts during a health crisis was not enough to protect the federal agency, postal workers, or everyday Americans.


Watch the video: Προβληματισμός στην τουρκική ηγεσία με το επίπεδο των ΕΔ - Καταστράφηκε ολόκληρη μονάδα (November 2021).